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MC 249

Clark, Bertha Marie Strittmatter. When WAC was a dirty word, Typescript, 1970?-1977?: A Finding Aid

Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University

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Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University

© President and Fellows of Harvard College

Descriptive Summary

Location: Collection stored off site: researchers must request access 36 hours before use.
Call No.: MC 249
Repository: Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University
Creator: Bertha Marie Strittmatter Clark
Title: When WAC Was a Dirty Word, Typescript, 1970?-1977?
Date(s): 1970?-1977?
Quantity: 1 Volumes
Language of materials: Materials in English.
Abstract: Personal account of Bertha Marie Strittmatter Clark's experiences as a member of the Women's Auxiliary Army Corps.

Immediate Source of Acquisition:

Accession number: 77-M157
This volume was given to the Schlesinger Library in October, 1977 by Bertha Marie Clark.

Processing Information:

Processed: November 1977
By: Gael Simonson

Access Restrictions:

Access. Collection is open for research.

Conditions Governing Use:

Copyright. Copyright in When WAC Was a Dirty Word is held by Bertha Marie Strittmatter Clark. Upon her death, copyright will transfer to the President and Fellows of Harvard College for the Schlesinger Library.
Copying. Papers may be copied in accordance with the library's usual procedures.

Preferred Citation:

When WAC was a dirty word, 1970?-1977?. MC 249, page #. Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.

BIOGRAPHY

Corporal Bertha Strittmatter enlisted in the Women's Auxiliary Army Corps (WAAC), later known as the Women's Army Corp (WAC). She was stationed at Stout Field, Indianapolis, Indiana from the beginning of World War II until the German surrender. Strittmatter was a columnist for WACTIVITIES and the Fielder.

SCOPE AND CONTENT

Corporal Bertha Strittmatter was among the enlistees in the Women's Auxiliary Army Corps (WAAC), later known as the Women's Army Corps (WAC). When WAC Was a Dirty Word is a personal account of her experiences as a WAC stationed at Stout Field, Indianapolis, Indiana, from the beginning of World War II to the German surrender. Included are anecdotes showing unfavorable attitudes towards WACs, and how these attitudes changed with the recognition of the WAC contribution to the war effort. Specifically, the account illustrates the problems WACs encountered in their social lives, their marriage and family relationships, and their work, especially when doing work formerly done only by men. Corporal Strittmatter's activities as a columnist, first for WACTIVITIES and later for the Fielder are also described. There are secondhand accounts of the experiences of soldiers in the Normandy invasion and in the Pacific.

Container List

Additional Index Terms

United States--Armed Forces--Women
When WAC Was a Dirty Word
World War, 1939-1945--Participation, Female
Women in war
United States. Army. Women's Army Corps

sch00507