[OASIS] Harvard University Library
OASIS: Online Archival Search Information System
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:FMUS.PEAB:pea00068View HOLLIS Record   Frames Version
Questions or Comments   Copyright Statement
995-11, 35-126, 36-131, 38-120, 39-97

Awatovi Expedition Records, 1930-1981 (inclusive) : A Finding Aid

Peabody Museum Archives
Harvard University
March 1995

[link]

c2011

Descriptive Summary

Repository: Peabody Museum Archives, Harvard University
Call No.: 995-11, 35-126, 36-131, 38-120, 39-97
Location: Peabody Museum Archives
Title: Awatovi Expedition Records,
Date(s): 1930-1981 (inclusive)
Quantity: 26 linear feet
Abstract: The collection documents the Peabody Museum Expedition to Awatovi (northeastern Arizona) from 1935-39, and includes historical material, financial records, field notes, diaries, photographs, drawings, correspondence, and field and artifact cards.

Processed by:

Evelyn Brew and Elizabeth Sandager; 1995; edited by Patricia H. Kervick, Associate Archivist; May 2011.

Acquisition Information:

995-11, 35-126, 36-131, 38-120, 39-97
These papers were transferred to the Archives by J.O. Brew, Evelyn Brew, and the Department of Anthropology in 1940. The majority of the records were not inventoried until 1994 and were accessioned in 1995. Some items from earlier accessions were held in the Collections Department accession files before rejoining the main body of material in the museum archives.

Access Restrictions:

Restrictions on access: none.

Historical Sketch

From 1935-1939, the Peabody Museum excavated the large ruined Hopi pueblo at Awatovi in northeastern Arizona. Dating from the 1300s, Awatovi grew to be an influential Hopi settlement and was the largest of the Hopi villages on Antelope Mesa. In 1540, the first European visitor arrived in Awatovi when Coronado dispatched Pedro de Tovar to the village in search of precious metals. The following 150 years were marked by tension and recapitulation between the Hopi and the Spaniards. This resulted in division in Hopi families and villages with members of the eastern villagers becoming followers of the Catholic religion and those from the western areas maintaining their Hopi ceremonies and beliefs. Finally in 1700, the Hopi who were hostile to the Spaniards and Catholicism sacked and destroyed the pueblo, killing all the men. Surviving families from Awatovi settled in other villages on the mesas and it is believed that the site was never inhabited again.
The large Awatovi site, covering approximately 23 acres, contained some 5000 rooms, often several stories high, as well as plazas and kivas. As it was destroyed by fire in 1700 and had not since been disturbed, the site offered archaeologists an important opportunity to study the history and culture of the Hopi people from the 13th to the beginning of the 18th centuries
In 1934 William H. Claflin, Jr. began to formulate a plan for a Peabody Museum expedition to Awatovi. Although not formally trained, Claflin had nurtured an enthusiasm for archaeology since his youth. Most recently he had co-sponsored the Museum's survey of southern Utah with Raymond Emerson. Claflin's friend, Donald Scott, director of the Peabody Museum, embraced Claflin's conception of a Museum expedition to Awatovi, and Scott soon asked John Otis Brew (J.O. Brew) to direct the expedition.
During the five field seasons (1935-1939), 1300 rooms were excavated at the pueblo of Awatovi, as well as a 17th century Franciscan mission. In addition to large scale excavations, 65 small test sites were also made at Awatovi. 11,700 artifacts of stone and bone and 8,500 pottery specimens were excavated and catalogued. In addition an enormous number of potsherds were washed, classified, and recorded. In the 1938 season alone, 243,871 postsherds were examined.
Detailed accounts of the archaeological work at Awatovi can be found in the following publications:

Sources:

Scope and Content Note:

The collection documents the Peabody Museum expedition to Awatovi and includes historical material, financial records, field notes, diaries, photographs, drawings, correspondence, and field and artifact cards. The papers were transferred to the Peabody Museum Archives in 1940 but the majority were not inventoried until 1994 and accessioned in 1995. Some items from earlier accessions were originally held in the Collection Department accession files before rejoining the main body of material in the museum archives.
The papers are arranged in six series:

Related Peabody Museum Collections:

Inventory:


pea00068