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MS Am 2731

Boston Religious Union of Associationists. Boston Religious Union of Associationists records, 1847-1851: Guide.

Houghton Library, Harvard Library, Harvard University

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Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 USA

© President and Fellows of Harvard College

Descriptive Summary

Location: b
Call No.: MS Am 2731
Repository: Houghton Library, Harvard Library, Harvard University
Creator: Boston Religious Union of Associationists.
Title: Boston Religious Union of Associationists records,
Date(s): 1847-1851.
Quantity: 1 collection (.2 linear feet (1 box)
Language of materials: Collection materials are in English.
Abstract: Records of the social reform group, the Boston Religious Union of Associationists.

Immediate Source of Acquisition:

No accession number. Purchase with funds from the Friends of the Library; received: 1933 May 17. Recataloged from Soc 859.275*.

Processing Information:

Processed by: Bonnie B. Salt

Conditions Governing Access:

There are no restrictions on physical access to this material.

Preferred Citation for Publication:

Boston Religious Union of Associationists Records, 1847-1851 (MS Am 2731). Houghton Library, Harvard University.

Related Materials

See also bMS Am 2730 for Boston Union of Associationists Records.

Biographical / Historical

The American Union of Associationists (founded May 1846), was devoted to the propagation of Fourierism, a philosophy developed by François Marie Charles Fourier (1772–1837), a French utopian socialist and philosopher. An affiliate group, The Boston Religious Union of Associationists, was organized in January of 1847, lasting until June of 1850, for the purpose of reconciling the Christian Church and social reform. Important persons in the group were: John Allen, William Henry Channing, John S. Dwight, George Ripley, Elizabeth Palmer Peabody, James T. Fisher and many others. Many members of this organization were also participants in their sister society, the Boston Union of Associationists, as well as the Brook Farm Community, which was a transcendentalist Utopian experiment in West Roxbury, Massachusetts.

Bibliography

For detailed information on this society, and its sister society see: Sterling F. Delano. A calendar of meetings of the 'Boston Religious Union of Associationists,' 1847-1850. Studies in the American Renaissance. 1985, pp. 187-267. Sterling F. Delano. The Boston Union of Associationists (1846-1851): 'Association is to me the great hope of the world.' Studies in the American Renaissance. 1996, pp.5-40.

Arrangement

Arranged alphabetically by author, then by title.

Scope and Contents

Includes: manuscript account books recording subscriptions and other funds and expenses, lists of subscribers, receipts; and printed informational fliers.

Container List


hou02171