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bMS 55

Unitarians in Transylvania and Hungary. Records, 1852-1950: A Finding Aid.

Andover-Harvard Theological Library, Harvard Divinity School, Harvard University

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Andover-Harvard Theological Library, Harvard Divinity School, Harvard University

© President and Fellows of Harvard College

Descriptive Summary

Call No.: bMS 55
Repository: Andover-Harvard Theological Library, Harvard Divinity School, Harvard University
Title: Unitarians in Transylvania and Hungary. Records, 1852-1950.
Date(s): 1852-1950
Quantity: 4 boxes
Abstract: This collection includes essays, stories and other documents concerning the Unitarian Church in Transylvania and Hungary. Photographs of clergymen, lay leaders, and churches are also included.

Acquisition Information:

Gift of the American Unitarian Association, 1968.

Processing Information:

Processed by Joseph Florez, 2012.

Access:

There are no restrictions on access to this collection.

Biographical / Historical

The Unitarian Church of Transylvania was first organized in 1568 under the Edict of Torda and led by former Calvinist bishop Francis David. The Church attracted significant opposition from other established religious groups in the region. After David's imprisonment and death in 1579, the Unitarian Church in Transylvania entered a period of relative decline. It was not until the 1730s that the church was reorganized and strengthened by Mihály Lombard de Szentábrahám, the author of the church's official declaration of faith. American and British Unitarians first became aware of the survival of the Unitarian Church in Transylvania in 1831. In 1899, the American Unitarian Association invited Bishop Jozsef Ferencz and the Transylvanian Unitarian Church to join the first International Association for Religious Freedom. Following the union of Transylvania with Romania at the end of World War I, Unitarian congregations were established in other parts of the country. The Transylvanian Unitarian Church is also a founding member of the International Council of Unitarians and Universalists.

Arrangement

Organized into the following series:

Scope and Contents

The collection is divided into three series. Series I consists of essays and stories written about the Unitarian Church in Transylvania arranged chronologically. Series II contains documents and writings of the Unitarian Church in Transylvania and Hungary, including papers relating to the question of religious freedom and correspondence with the League of Nations. Series III is comprised of photographs of Unitarian clergy and members and a collection of glass lantern slides with a list of descriptions written during the American Unitarian Commission visit to Transylvania in 1907.

Container List


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