[OASIS] Harvard University Library
OASIS: Online Archival Search Information System
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:VIT.BB:ber00001View HOLLIS Record   Frames Version
Questions or Comments   Copyright Statement
BER 1

Stenbock, Stanislaus Eric, Count, 1860-1895. Papers: A Finding Aid

Biblioteca Berenson, Villa I Tatti - The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies

[link]


Biblioteca Berenson, Villa I Tatti - The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies

© President and Fellows of Harvard College

Descriptive Summary

Call No.: BER 1
Repository: Biblioteca Berenson, Villa I Tatti - The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies
Creator: Stenbock, Stanislaus Eric, Count, 1860-1895
Title: Stenbock, Eric. Papers 1887-2002
Date(s): 1887-2002
Quantity: 1 boxes (22 folders)
Abstract: These papers primarily contain writings by Stenbock in manuscript or typescript form, as well as some published editions of his work.

Processing Information:

Processed by Jacalyn R. Blume (April 2002). Updated by Ilaria Della Monica (September 2010).

Conditions Governing Access:

Unrestricted.

Preferred Citation:

Stanislaus Eric Stenbock Papers (1887-2002), Biblioteca Berenson, Villa I Tatti — The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies.

Biography

Stanislaus Eric Stenbock was the count of Bogesund. He was born in South West England (March 12, 1860), and was the only child of Lucy Sophia Frerichs, an English cotton heiress, and Count Erich Stenbock, a member of a Baltic German noble family with Swedish roots and vast estates in what is now Estonia.
Stenbock attended Balliol College, Oxford, although he never completed a degree. There he met Frank Costelloe, who later became the first husband of Mary Berenson. Costelloe was his lawyer and advisor, and Stenbock was a close friend of the Costelloe family. While at Oxford, Eric was deeply influenced by the homosexual Pre-Raphaelite artist and illustrator Simeon Solomon. He converted while at Oxford to Roman Catholicism, to the horror of his family, taking for himself the name Stanislaus. At the end of his life, he seemed to have developed a syncretist religion containing elements of Catholicism, Buddhism and idolatry.
He inherited his family's estates in 1885 and returned to live in his manor house at Kolkbriefly. By 1895, he was heavily addicted to opium and alcohol and moved back to Brighton to convalesce at his mother's house, Withdeane Hall, on the London Road, where he seems to have spent a lot of time in his room with the curtains drawn, burning candles in front of images of Buddha and the poet Shelley, as reported by Mary Costelloe, his business manager's wife, who later married Bernard Berenson.
In his short life he published three slim volumes of poetry—Love, Sleep and Dreams, Myrtle, Rue and Cypress and The Shadow of Death—and one collection of short stories, Studies of Death. He also had a short lycanthropic tale, "The Other Side", published in The Spirit Lamp, a journal edited by Oscar Wilde's lover, Lord Alfred Douglas, and two translations of Balzac in Shorter Stories from Balzac. In literary and social circles he was associated with Cénacle, a group of literary dandies. He died in 1895 (April 26) as a result of his alcoholism and opium addiction. He was buried near his mother's home in Brighton, and his heart was sent to Estonia.

Scope and Contents

These papers primarily contain writings by Stenbock in manuscript or typescript form, as well as some published editions of his work. Some were published posthumously. The papers also contain some correspondence, mostly with Frank Costelloe.

Container List

Additional Index Terms

Manuscripts for publication
Pre-Raphaelitism -- England
Theater -- England
Poems
Cénacle group
Typescripts
Costelloe, Benjamin Francis Conn, 1855-1899

ber00001